About Douglas Tengdin, CFA

Mr. Tengdin is the Chief Investment Officer at Charter Trust Company and author of “The Global Market Update”. The audio version of each post can be heard on radio stations throughout New England every weekday. Mr. Tengdin graduated from Dartmouth College, Magna Cum Laude. He received his Master of Arts from Trinity Divinity School, Magna Cum Laude and received his Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation in 1992. Mr. Tengdin has been managing investment portfolios for over 30 years, working for Bank of Boston, State Street Global Advisors, Citibank – Tunisia, and Banknorth Group. Throughout his career, Mr. Tengdin has emphasized helping clients manage their financial risks in difficult environments where they can profit from investing in diverse assets in diverse settings. - Leave a comment if you have any questions—I read them all! - And Follow me on Twitter @GlobalMarketUpd

Public Issues, Private Issues

By | 2017-07-17T16:44:41+00:00 July 13th, 2017|Global Market Update|

What is private equity? Source: Wikipedia Private equity is an equity position in a company that isn’t publicly traded – that hasn’t been listed on a public stock exchange. For ordinary investors, there are two ways to invest in private equity. You can invest in a private equity fund, or you can give money to a friend or family member in exchange for a share of their business venture. Limited partners of Bain Capital’s Asia XI Fund are private equity investors, as are your [...]

Seeking Safety

By | 2017-07-17T16:45:21+00:00 July 12th, 2017|Global Market Update|

Are there any safe places? Photo: Ben Tubby. Source: Wikipedia During the Cold War the superpowers relied on a doctrine called “Mutually Assured Destruction,” or MAD. The idea was that neither party would initiate a nuclear first strike, because enough of the other side’s nuclear arsenal would survive to retaliate. The global devastation would be so complete that both sides would lose. To average folks, the doctrine seemed “mad,” indeed. There was a low-grade fear surrounding everyday life. If someone irrational got hold of [...]

On Tripods

By | 2017-07-17T16:45:42+00:00 July 11th, 2017|Global Market Update|

Tripods are stable. Photo: Eriger. Source: Pixabay They allow us to keep things steady. Their three legs lean upon each other making the entire structure more stable than any one leg could be. We use tripods in photography, weapons, surveying, and for offshore wind turbines – anywhere we don’t want things shifting around. Tripods are often used as metaphors, as well, for any area where we need constancy. Our military depends on a nuclear triad: missiles, bombers, and submarines. English teachers use grammar, literature, [...]

Rx: Competition

By | 2017-07-17T16:46:20+00:00 July 10th, 2017|Global Market Update|

What’s wrong with the health care debate? Public Domain. Source: Wikipedia I don’t pretend to have a solution. Health care is complex and multi-faceted, with lots of market and non-market elements. And it’s huge: a sixth of our $20 trillion economy. But one thing that’s so disheartening about the debate is that it mostly focusses on the demand side of the equation. Health insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, exchanges – these are all ways that we get access to care. It’s as if we debated food [...]

PC David and Goliath

By | 2017-07-17T16:47:00+00:00 July 7th, 2017|Global Market Update|

Remember Compaq? Photo: Tiziano Garuti. Source: Wikipedia The PC maker was founded in 1982. It went from start-up to $1 billion in sales in only five years. It tripled that number in four more years, becoming the third-largest PC-maker – a leading producer of a revolutionary product. Compaq made a “luggable” computer – a PC that weighed 25 pounds or so. You could “lug” it from place to place, unlike desktops, which needed a lot more time to set up. It was one of [...]

The (Serious) French Connection

By | 2017-07-17T16:47:38+00:00 July 6th, 2017|Global Market Update|

What do you do when your boss announced plans for a layoff? Emmanuel Macron. Source: Wikipedia That’s what Emmanuel Macron did a couple days ago, in a powerful speech to both houses of the French Parliament. The assembly has 925 seats, and Macron announced plans to cut its number by a third. If the houses don’t agree, he said, he will bring his initiative to the voters directly. He also told the lawmakers that they need to legislate less, that France can’t keep up [...]

A Durable Future (Part 2)

By | 2017-07-17T16:48:08+00:00 July 5th, 2017|Global Market Update|

Do durable assets create durable returns? Jason and the Golden Fleece, c. 340 BCE. Source: Wikipedia Gold and silver are often touted as “alternative” investments. That is, their returns aren’t highly correlated with other, more typical, investments. So they have the potential to diversify an investment portfolio while providing return in their own right. Gold and silver served as a monetary standard for millennia. Are they useful investments? It’s hard to evaluate the long-term returns of a monetary base. The price of gold was [...]

A Durable Future (Part 1)

By | 2017-07-17T16:48:42+00:00 July 3rd, 2017|Global Market Update -- A Durable Future (Part 1)|

Do durable assets make sense as investments? Gold Roman Aureus. Source: Wikipedia Some things have been around a long time: silver and gold were currencies and a store of value for millennia; fine jewelry has always been a sign of status; and housing and land are always in demand—everyone has to live and world somewhere. But do they make sense in an investment portfolio? A little perspective is important. People get very emotional about real investments. We’re naturally attached to our homes. And how [...]

The Future of Factors

By | 2017-07-18T11:03:45+00:00 June 30th, 2017|Global Market Update|

What is factor investing?     Photo: Kanenori: Source: Pixabay Investment factors are a way to understand why stocks or bonds perform the way they do. Investments are driven by risks of various kinds. Bond returns are driven by duration, credit, prepayments, the yield curve, and – for global portfolios – currency risk. Stock returns are affected by their size, industry, quality, and country. Real estate is impacted by location and property type. And everything impacted by the economy, inflation, liquidity, the capital structure, [...]

Little Problems, Big Problems

By | 2017-07-18T11:05:37+00:00 June 29th, 2017|Global Market Update|

What makes small stocks so volatile? “Breezing Up” By Winslow Homer. Source: National Gallery of Art Small stocks are generally much more volatile than big stocks. They can jump or drop by up to 20% in a day, while it’s big news if a giant firm like Microsoft or Exxon moves 3%. And their aggregate indices are more volatile as well. Over the past decade, large cap monthly volatility has been around 15%, while small cap volatility has averaged almost 20%. The extra jumpiness [...]